Commercial Contracts

  • June 20, 2024

    Panama Claims Immunity In Construction Firm's Countersuit

    Panama has urged a Florida federal court to reject a Miami businessman's countersuit alleging that a previous settlement bars the enforcement of a $4.8 million arbitral award against him and his construction firm, saying that it has immunity and that no such agreement existed.

  • June 20, 2024

    Judge Backs Virgin Over Boeing In Clash Over IP Injunction

    A Virginia federal judge on Thursday ruled that Virgin Galactic can share allegedly proprietary Boeing documents with partner companies to help develop a space plane carrier aircraft, amid Boeing's breach of contract and misappropriation of trade secrets suit against Virgin.

  • June 20, 2024

    ACC Fights FSU's Stay Appeal In Media Rights Contract Suit

    The Atlantic Coast Conference has urged North Carolina's highest court to support a judge's decision to reject a bid by Florida State University to pause the organization's media rights lawsuit while a related action plays out in the Sunshine State.

  • June 20, 2024

    Madonna Mulls Sanctions Bid After Fans Drop 'Frivolous' Suit

    Attorneys defending Madonna, Live Nation and the Barclays Center against allegations that fans were "lulled" into buying tickets for a tardy show slammed the plaintiffs' unannounced dismissal of the "frivolous" case, telling a New York federal judge Wednesday they don't agree to bear their own costs and might seek sanctions.

  • June 20, 2024

    Walmart, Capital One Settle Credit Card Agreement Spat

    Capital One NA has reached a settlement with Walmart Inc. resolving the retailer's claims that its credit card partner wasn't meeting the customer service standards laid out in their agreement, according to a joint letter filed in New York federal court.

  • June 20, 2024

    Insurer Hit With Coverage Suit Over Ohio Grocery Shooting

    Pittsburgh-based Giant Eagle Inc. is claiming that a security contractor's insurer, Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Co., has refused to cover its defense costs in a lawsuit over a shooting at a Cleveland, Ohio, store, and was trying to get the grocer to drop its third-party claims against the contractor.

  • June 20, 2024

    Conn. Firm Says Thomson Reuters Unit Bungled Web Overhaul

    A Thomson Reuters unit botched a portion of a $2,336-per-month contract to overhaul a Middlebury, Connecticut, law firm's website, blend its online presence into FindLaw and include its attorneys in "Super Lawyers" listings, the firm says in a state court lawsuit made public on Thursday.

  • June 20, 2024

    PPG Sues Westlake In Delaware Over $707M Brazil Liability

    Pittsburgh global paint supplier PPG Industries Inc. has sued chemical supplier Westlake Corp. in Delaware's Court of Chancery, accusing Westlake of breaching a 2012 agreement to accept liabilities related to a cargo ship fire that happened off the coast of Brazil in 1998.

  • June 20, 2024

    NLRB Attys, Calif. Tribe Settle Casino Subpoena Dispute

    A California federal court dismissed on Thursday National Labor Relations Board prosecutors' bids to enforce subpoenas requesting a list of casino employees who could be in a proposed bargaining unit from a tribe and a gambling company, with agency attorneys saying the parties settled the dispute.

  • June 20, 2024

    DLA Piper Adds 2 Entertainment Attys In NY From Reed Smith

    Two entertainment and advertising partners have left Reed Smith LLP to join DLA Piper, including the first woman to serve as the chief negotiator for the Joint Policy Committee, the bargaining representative for the advertising industry in negotiations for the multibillion-dollar commercials collective bargaining agreements with SAG-AFTRA and the American Federation of Musicians.

  • June 20, 2024

    NC Law Firm Fights Ex-Client's Bid To Ditch Malpractice Deal

    A personal injury law firm and one of its former attorneys urged a North Carolina state appeals court to enforce their settlement with a prior client in a legal malpractice suit, as the client asserts that he was sick during mediation and didn't know what he was doing when he signed the agreement.

  • June 20, 2024

    Dickinson Wright Brings On McDermott, Bell Nunnally Attys

    Dickinson Wright PLLC added a pair of new members who include a commercial finance and real estate attorney from Bell Nunnally & Martin LLP based in Austin, Texas, and a tax and incentives attorney from McDermott Will & Emery LLP in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

  • June 20, 2024

    Ex-BVI Ports Director Gets 9 Years For Drug Smuggling Plot

    A Florida federal judge on Thursday sentenced the former managing director of the British Virgin Islands Ports Authority to just over 9 years in prison for participating in a scheme involving a former BVI premier to move tons of Colombian cocaine through BVI ports to the United States.

  • June 18, 2024

    Qualcomm Investors Ink $75M Deal Over Licensing Practices

    Qualcomm Inc. investors asked a California federal judge to greenlight a $75 million settlement that would resolve their claims that the chipmaker misled the market by stating it kept its licensing and chip-supply businesses separate when it regularly bundled the two in negotiations and agreements.

  • June 18, 2024

    Doubt Cast On Free Whole Foods Delivery 'Bait And Switch'

    A Washington federal judge appeared skeptical at a hearing Tuesday of claims that Amazon misled Prime members by advertising free Whole Foods grocery deliveries and then later pulling the perk in a "bait and switch," noting the retail giant has reserved the right to change Prime members' benefits.

  • June 18, 2024

    Microsoft Says Starbucks Ruling Hurts FTC's Activision Case

    Microsoft told the Ninth Circuit on Monday that the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling requiring labor regulators to meet a four-factor test in order to win a preliminary injunction undercuts the Federal Trade Commission's bid to halt the company's $68.7 billion acquisition of Activision Blizzard Inc.

  • June 18, 2024

    Lender Sues To Recoup $1M From Renowned Boston Chef

    A small Massachusetts bank is taking an award-winning Boston chef and restaurateur to court in an effort to recover more than $1 million in loans intended to start what turned out to be a short-lived eatery just outside the city in 2023.

  • June 18, 2024

    COVID Test Maker Can't Shake All Of $30M Faulty Kit Suit

    A New Jersey federal judge won't let California-based laboratory equipment maker Atila Biosystems Inc. out of a suit alleging it sold faulty COVID-19 testing kits, saying Fusion Diagnostic Laboratories LLC has adequately pled a breach of contract claim.

  • June 18, 2024

    Archegos Trader Doubles Down On Hwang Accusations

    A former protégé of Archegos founder Bill Hwang told New York federal jurors Tuesday that the hedge fund boss directed manipulative and improper trading, pushing back on insinuations by Hwang's counsel that the trades were above-board.

  • June 18, 2024

    DOJ Says DC Circ. Shouldn't Rethink Realtor Antitrust Probe

    The U.S. Department of Justice has told the D.C. Circuit that its April decision allowing it to reopen an investigation into the National Association of Realtors doesn't conflict with any U.S. Supreme Court or circuit court decisions and that the NAR's rehearing petition should be denied.

  • June 18, 2024

    Korean Airline Can't Get $50M Catering Award Nixed

    A California judge has enforced a $50 million arbitral award issued to a catering company following a dispute with South Korea's Asiana Airlines, rejecting an argument that the award couldn't be enforced because the underlying contract was tainted by corruption.

  • June 18, 2024

    Nuggets Accused Of Racial Profiling Over Front-Row Seat

    A fan who says that employees of the Denver Nuggets racially profiled him at a game in December, in a confrontation he recorded and posted on social media, is suing the NBA franchise, its arena and owner Stan Kroenke for discrimination.

  • June 18, 2024

    High Bidder Insists Auctioneers Turn Over Potential Van Gogh

    The highest bidder in an auction for a painting that might be a previously unknown work by Dutch master Vincent van Gogh is entitled to summary judgment for breach of contract against auction houses that have refused to turn it over to her, she said in a new filing in her state court lawsuit.

  • June 18, 2024

    Tilray, Anheuser-Busch Want Out Of Beer Contract Suit

    Anheuser-Busch InBev and Tilray Brands Inc. are asking a New York federal judge to schedule a pre-motion conference to discuss their proposed motions to dismiss a suit by CraftCanTravel LLC alleging they interfered with its exclusive distribution deal, arguing the claims are baseless and speculative.

  • June 17, 2024

    Trader Claims Firm Owes Bonus On $37M Texas Storm Profits

    A trader told a Denver jury Monday that a Colorado energy marketing company fired him as retaliation after he accused the CEO of failing to pay out his cut of $37 million from trades made during a 2021 Texas storm that caused natural gas prices to spike.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Glassblowing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    I never expected that glassblowing would strongly influence my work as an attorney, but it has taught me the importance of building a solid foundation for your work, learning from others and committing to a lifetime of practice, says Margaret House at Kalijarvi Chuzi.

  • What 11th Circ. Fearless Fund Ruling Means For DEI In Courts

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent backing of a freeze on the Fearless Fund's grants to women of color building new companies marks the latest major development in litigation related to diversity, equity and inclusion and may be used to question other DEI programs targeted at providing opportunities to certain classes of individuals, say attorneys at Simpson Thacher.

  • Opinion

    Paid Noncompetes Offer A Better Solution Than FTC's Ban

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    A better alternative to the Federal Trade Commission's recent and widely contested noncompete ban would be a nationwide bright-line rule requiring employers to pay employees during the noncompete period, says Steven Kayman at Rottenberg Lipman.

  • How Associates Can Build A Professional Image

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    As hybrid work arrangements become the norm in the legal industry, early-career attorneys must be proactive in building and maintaining a professional presence in both physical and digital settings, ensuring that their image aligns with their long-term career goals, say Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners and Estelle Winsett at Estelle Winsett Professional Image Consulting.

  • Firms Must Rethink How They Train New Lawyers In AI Age

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    As law firms begin to use generative artificial intelligence to complete lower-level legal tasks, they’ll need to consider new ways to train summer associates and early-career attorneys, keeping in mind the five stages of skill acquisition, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Cyber Takeaways For Cos. From Verizon Data Breach Report

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    Camilo Artiga-Purcell at Kiteworks analyzes the key findings of the 2024 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report from a legal perspective, examining the implications for organizations' cybersecurity strategies and compliance efforts.

  • Foreign Discovery Insights 2 Years After ZF Automotive

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    Although an Arizona federal court decision last month demonstrates that Section 1782 discovery may still be available to foreign arbitral parties, the scope of such discovery has narrowed greatly since the U.S. Supreme Court's 2022 decision in ZF Automotive, and there are a few potential trends for practitioners to follow, say attorneys at Venable.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

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    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Rare Robinson-Patman Ruling Exhibits Key Antitrust Risk

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    A rare federal court decision under the Robinson-Patman Act, which prohibits certain kinds of price discrimination, highlights the antitrust risks faced by certain suppliers and is likely to be cited by future plaintiffs and enforcement officials calling for renewed scrutiny of pricing and discounting practices, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • Beware Shifting Provisions In Middle-Market Loan Documents

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    In recent years, many credit facility provisions previously considered to be market standard have been negotiated, often turning in favor of borrowers, demanding renewed diligence from workout officers and restructuring counsel operating in the middle market, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Patent Lessons From 7 Federal Circuit Reversals In May

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    A look at recent cases where the Federal Circuit reversed or vacated decisions by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board or a federal district court provide guidance on how to succeed on appeal by clarifying the obviousness analysis of design patents, the finality of a judgment, and more, say Denise De Mory and Li Guo at Bunsow De Mory.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Shows Lies Must Go To Nature Of Bargain

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Milheiser decision, vacating six mail fraud convictions, clarifies that the key question in federal fraud cases is not whether lies were told, but what they were told about — thus requiring defense counsel to rethink their strategies, say Charles Kreindler and Krista Landis at Sheppard Mullin.

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